Honeymoons of the past…

Last week my family was fortunate to partake in a quiet celebration of my parents’ 65th wedding anniversary.

We sat around the table enjoying a simple meal and listened to my mom and dad as they each took turns recalling their wedding day and the “reception” that followed.

We listened intently as they described how “things” differed “in those days”… the wedding celebration, in church, on a Saturday morning… a walk through the town and a simple home reception immediately followed for close friends and relatives… then socializing of “guests” until the wee hours of the morning – while the newlyweds waited patiently on the sidelines for everyone to leave… and then “honeymoon seclusion” for 8 days! Yes, an 8-day seclusion. Apparently, the custom was that newlyweds were frowned upon if they showed their faces in public prior to the 8th day following the ceremony. And, on that 8th day, they were expected to be first seen at Holy Mass – in church, where it all began.

The reception consisted of home-made treats/goodies and, get this, home-made hard liquor! Yes, my father had a big smile on his face as my mother explained how he had to walk to and from Catanzaro to purchase the alcohol in order to create the base for the distilled luxury.

At one point, my father sarcastically described how a “limousine” picked them up and took them to the honeymoon “retreat” at one of our lands outside town – no such luck! Such things did not exist, for them – even in their dreams.

Of course, I am certain that exceptions existed and that social status likely determined the elaborate-ness of a wedding celebration and a “honeymoon” – the description my parents shared with us was the wedding and honeymoon of a “common” couple.

A look back at the simple times.

Exhibit Photo 24 of 24

The final image presented is one that was taken from the place known as U Castidu or Il Castello (direct translation = “the castle”), much higher in altitude than U Pandinu. The chair is symbolic that Gagliato awaits the viewer, to return and enjoy the simplicity and natural beauty of the town…

Hope you enjoyed the images…

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Exhibit Photo 24 of 24

Exhibit Photo 14 of 24

In contrast to yesterday’s post, this is an image of a property that has already been renovated, along Via Regina Margherita. Notice the section of stucco that lifted and peeled away – it adds character – it’s the layers below the surface that are screaming out to remind us that they still exist below the visible surface –

[Click on image to view a full screen version.]

Exhibit Photo 14 of 24

Exhibit Photo 1 of 24

We’ll start off with an image of the Town Hall or il municipio, on Via Regina Margherita. As noted in our book, Gagliato, I chose to photograph certain buildings and areas of town with a super wide angle lens intentionally to give the perspective of a child – the child that I was when I left Gagliato at the age of 8.

[Click on image to view a full screen version.]

Photo 1 of 24

The exhibit

Starting today and continuing for the next 24 days, I will post the 24 images that were exhibited in Gagliato as a part of NanoGagliato 2011 – one image per day. Today’s post will present the Artists’ Statement that accompanied the photographs.

Please feel free to comment on any or all of the images.

Enjoy!

[Click on the image if you’d like to see an enlarged version.]

NanoGagliato 2011 Artists' Statement

More Photos… Part III – NanoGagliato Opening Night

I am so disappointed that I was unable to attend this beautiful event.

Many people worked very hard for long periods of time to make the event a reality. And, judging from the photographs, it looked like the participants enjoyed themselves and the town was very proud to host the event.

Take a look at the photographs to get a very brief glimpse of the evening’s festivities:

… Palazzo Romiti was the place to be

… Food prepared by the residents of Gagliato

… Visitors from around the World

… Prof. Mauro Ferrari, Mrs. Paola Ferrari and Jo Ann Fleischhauer worked with the residents to make it all happen. It is so obvious that the Ferraris are enamoured with Gagliato and that Gagliato has embraced them.

I would like to take this opportunity to again thank Prof. Mauro Ferrari, Mrs. Paola Ferrari and Jo Ann Fleischhauer for allowing Stephanie and I to be a part of NanoGagliato 2011. The process with us began in October of 2010 and culminated with photographs created and delivered to Jo Ann (in Houston) in July and she then personally transported them to Gagliato. It is obvious that great care went into the selection and preparation of the gallery space and the setup appeared to naturally blend in with the rustic surroundings. Our photographs looked amazing in the cantina. Thanks again. And, we would like to extend a big thank-you to the Romitis for graciously hosting the gallery.

Enjoy these 36 images (courtesy of Jo Ann Fleischhauer) that I have selected from the opening night… there are many to choose from and I will post more in the future. But, for now…

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More pictures from Gagliato… Part II – Preparation of the town for NanoGagliato

In anticipation of NanoGagliato 2011, Jo Ann Fleischhauer and Paola Ferrari along with several volunteers from Gagliato prepared the town with large canvas images depicting selections of nano-subjects. The canvas images were placed on the same buildings/structures that were featured in the photography exhibit which took place inside Palazzo Romiti (July 23rd – August 7th).

There are 39 images in the slideshow that follows (compliments/courtesy of Jo Ann Fleischhauer):

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Finally… some pictures from Gagliato… Part I – Photography Exhibit

I am so happy to share with you some images that have been sent to me by Jo Ann Fleischhauer.

This first set presents the exhibit set up in the cantina of Palazzo Romiti.

Unfortunately, as mentioned previously, Stephanie and I were unable to attend. But, these images show the obvious care, attention and creativity put into the framing, set up and presentation. Stephanie and I are very proud and truly thankful. We will reserve our full “thank you” until all of the selected sets have been presented on this blog.

There are 28 images in this slideshow.

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NanoGagliato 2011 presents Poetic Scales: From Sand to Stones

I encourage all residents of Gagliato and visitors during this time to participate:

 

NanoGagliato 2011 presents Poetic Scales: From Sand to Stones, a multi layered art exhibition and visual dialogue between the residents of Gagliato, the scientists of NanoGagliato and Nicola and Stephanie Gareri from Toronto, Canada.

This exhibition weaves together photographs of Gagliato’s rich architectural past with large scale images of current explorations in nanoscience. An imaginative textual dialogue takes place between the residents of Gagliato and the visiting scientists using art as a bridge between people of different cultures and lifestyles.

Nico and Stephanie Gareri of Toronto, Canada, have captured Gagliato’s rich, poetic, architectural history in elegantly lush black+white photographic images. Presented suspended from the wooden ceiling beams in the frantoio of Palazzo Romiti, the Gareris’ photographs speak of visual memories and archeological poems steeped in history and family stories forgotten or never revealed.

Complementing the images produced by the Gareris, an exhibition of large-scale nano tapestries have been installed on the walls throughout the streets of Gagliato. “Tiny” nano structures captured with highly sophisticated imaging techniques have been enlarged and presented as nanobillboards or tapestries. Vibrantly colored using computer software, the once b/w microscopy images take on the appearance of exotic abstract landscapes. The “visual” conversation was created when the residents of Gagliato were asked to imaginatively respond to the exhibited nanoimages with short verbal phrases. After reading the residents’ remarks, the scientists offered their own creative responses, as well as a short explanation of what the scientific photograph actually was. Using a variety of fonts and lettering styles, the text was integrated into the images, to function as another visual layer.

The locations captured in the Gareris’ photographs pinpoint the locations of the nanotapestries. As the viewer walks through the streets searching for the nanoimages, the viewer begins to discover a layer of Gagliato’s personal story and poetry. The Grand Opening of the exhibition is set for Saturday July 23rd, at Palazzo Romiti (corner of via Roma and via Regina Margherita), around 8 pm. The ladies of Gagliato will offer traditional dishes, in the town’s welcome to the NanoGagliatesi 2011. The exhibit will run through August 7th.

The above information was taken from the NanoGagliato 2011 site at www.nanogagliato.org.

NanoGagliato 2011

Where will you be at 8:00 p.m. this coming Saturday?

If you happen to be in Gagliato, drop in at the opening reception for NanoGagliato 2011 at Palazzo Romiti – at the corner of Via Roma and Via Regina Margherita.

Unconfirmed events will include the following:

1. Photography exhibition in the cantina – photos by Nicola and Stephanie Gareri.

2. Photo installation throughout the lower part of town (‘u Pandinu) by Jo Ann Fleischhauer.

3. Introduction of the NanoGagliato speakers and program.

Food and refreshments will be provided by the residents of Gagliato.

More information can be found at the site dedicated to NanoGagliato 2011.

Upcoming Photo Exhibit In Gagliato

Well, hello everyone!

So sorry for the absence and inactivity, but I’ve been hard at work preparing a photo exhibit that will take place in Gagliato.

At the moment, the plans include an opening reception on July 23rd and the exhibit is slated to run until August 13th. The exhibition is a part of an art installation for NanoGagliato 2011 and will be curated by the person responsible, artist Jo Ann Fleischhauer, who hails from Houston, Texas.

More information will be made available over the coming days, and more details will be provided about NanoGagliato 2011.

So, just wanted to say hello!

Soon,

Nico

Presentation of “Gagliato” Photography Book To Gagliato

On January 10, 2009 Gagliato was presented with “Gagliato”, the photography book recently released by Nicola & Stephanie Gareri. The ceremony included an introduction by Gagliato’s Mayor, Giovanni Sgro’, the reading of the authors’ letter by lawyer Francesco Gareri from Argusto (the authors’ representative), and closing remarks by lawyer and former Mayor, Luigi Romiti. Many were in attendance as books were distributed to individuals who hosted or assisted the photographers while in Gagliato as well as to individuals who were photographed and presented in the book. Photographs of the presentation are available online at the La Strumba blog as well as at the Ergon Cultural Society site (see the “links” section). The various written sections of the book will be translated into Italian and presented in summary form on the La Strumba blog over the coming weeks.

“Gagliato” Photo Exhibit And Book Launch

Nico (Nicola) and Stephanie Gareri’s first photographic (coffee table) book, simply titled “Gagliato”, was launched on September 18th, 2008 at the Joseph D. Carrier Art Gallery in Toronto. The 300+ guests in attendance were treated to a special presentation of the “Gagliato” photographic exhibit which included 46 framed limited edition prints, musical interludes by Jon Gareri (piano) and Sahra Featherstone (harp), and a delicious variety of cheeses, breads, grapes, berries, figs and wines. The exhibit was well received by the many visitors during its scheduled run (September 1st – 28th) and its extended stay until October 2nd. The book “Gagliato” is available on-line and at selected locations. Please visit http://www.studio-on-the-avenue.com for details.