“u focularu” 11 maggio 1973 – pg 4

Finally we get to see some images of some of the founding and executive members of the original Club Gagliato. Yes, at that time, the Club had a physical location where members could visit to socialize. The “sede” of the Club was on Wilson Avenue, just west of Dufferin Street.

This page features an article written in English by Peter Saccoia.

[As with the first page, if you click on the image it will open in a new window and then you can zoom in to read the articles.]

Page 4 of “u focularu” newspaper dated May 11, 1973

“u focularu” – 11 maggio 1973

Well, dear friends, as promised, I am sharing with you my recent finds…

The image presented below is a scanned version of the front cover of the very first issue of “u focularu” (Anno 1, Numero 1) and it is dated May 11, 1973.

Each page measures approximately 12″ x 17.5″ (30cm x 44cm). The front page features prose and an article by Dante Amato, an article by Egidia Amato, and an “open letter” from the President of Club Gagliato, Mr. Giuseppe Gareri (yes, my brother).

I believe it will be fun to create individual posts of each page in the newspaper. Next post will feature page 2.

Click on the image to open a new window which you can then zoom in to read.

Please, let me have some feedback!

Soon,

Nicola Gareri

The first issue
The first issue of “u focularu” dated May 11, 1973

Archives unearthed!

Hello friends!

Today was cleaning day for me and guess what I found? Old photos, newspapers and editions of “u focularu” from the early 70’s! Yes, material from almost 40 years ago.

So, I thought that it would be great and that I should share some of my finds with everyone. If you’re interested, stay tuned. I will organize the material and likely do a little scanning and Photoshop work to present old pictures and articles from the defunct Gagliato Social Club (of Toronto). Given that I was the last President of that club, I believe I have the freedom and authority to publish some of that material. And even if I don’t, I’m going to do it anyway!

I am certain that you will find some of the material interesting.

It will take me a couple of weeks to get things posted. As in the past, I will likely upload one post per week.

Hope you’re all doing well.

Nicola

Honeymoons of the past…

Last week my family was fortunate to partake in a quiet celebration of my parents’ 65th wedding anniversary.

We sat around the table enjoying a simple meal and listened to my mom and dad as they each took turns recalling their wedding day and the “reception” that followed.

We listened intently as they described how “things” differed “in those days”… the wedding celebration, in church, on a Saturday morning… a walk through the town and a simple home reception immediately followed for close friends and relatives… then socializing of “guests” until the wee hours of the morning – while the newlyweds waited patiently on the sidelines for everyone to leave… and then “honeymoon seclusion” for 8 days! Yes, an 8-day seclusion. Apparently, the custom was that newlyweds were frowned upon if they showed their faces in public prior to the 8th day following the ceremony. And, on that 8th day, they were expected to be first seen at Holy Mass – in church, where it all began.

The reception consisted of home-made treats/goodies and, get this, home-made hard liquor! Yes, my father had a big smile on his face as my mother explained how he had to walk to and from Catanzaro to purchase the alcohol in order to create the base for the distilled luxury.

At one point, my father sarcastically described how a “limousine” picked them up and took them to the honeymoon “retreat” at one of our lands outside town – no such luck! Such things did not exist, for them – even in their dreams.

Of course, I am certain that exceptions existed and that social status likely determined the elaborate-ness of a wedding celebration and a “honeymoon” – the description my parents shared with us was the wedding and honeymoon of a “common” couple.

A look back at the simple times.

Well… did you enjoy the exhibit images?

After 24 straight days of posting images, it feels like I’m coming up for air from a long swim… I now have to get creative and come up with something else to keep the momentum flowing.

As can be seen from the “Hits” stats, we’ve officially surpassed the 7,000 mark! That is an awesome feat and I thank everyone who has been a loyal follower/visitor to this site.

Time is again becoming very precious for me and, at the moment, it appears that I may have an opportunity to only post weekly, rather than daily. I apologize in advance, but I am embarking on a new project (which I cannot discuss at the moment) which will require huge amounts of research and preparation.

At this time, I would like to whole-heartedly invite interested individuals to submit articles that can be posted on this site, to supplement the posts that I will create.

I will try my best to have the next post up by this coming Monday. Until then, thanks again and I wish you all a very happy American Thanksgiving and a buona fine settimana (end of week) – have a great weekend!

Exhibit Photo 24 of 24

The final image presented is one that was taken from the place known as U Castidu or Il Castello (direct translation = “the castle”), much higher in altitude than U Pandinu. The chair is symbolic that Gagliato awaits the viewer, to return and enjoy the simplicity and natural beauty of the town…

Hope you enjoyed the images…

[Click on image to view a full screen version.]

Exhibit Photo 24 of 24

Exhibit Photo 14 of 24

In contrast to yesterday’s post, this is an image of a property that has already been renovated, along Via Regina Margherita. Notice the section of stucco that lifted and peeled away – it adds character – it’s the layers below the surface that are screaming out to remind us that they still exist below the visible surface –

[Click on image to view a full screen version.]

Exhibit Photo 14 of 24

Exhibit Photo 1 of 24

We’ll start off with an image of the Town Hall or il municipio, on Via Regina Margherita. As noted in our book, Gagliato, I chose to photograph certain buildings and areas of town with a super wide angle lens intentionally to give the perspective of a child – the child that I was when I left Gagliato at the age of 8.

[Click on image to view a full screen version.]

Photo 1 of 24

The exhibit

Starting today and continuing for the next 24 days, I will post the 24 images that were exhibited in Gagliato as a part of NanoGagliato 2011 – one image per day. Today’s post will present the Artists’ Statement that accompanied the photographs.

Please feel free to comment on any or all of the images.

Enjoy!

[Click on the image if you’d like to see an enlarged version.]

NanoGagliato 2011 Artists' Statement

More Photos… Part III – NanoGagliato Opening Night

I am so disappointed that I was unable to attend this beautiful event.

Many people worked very hard for long periods of time to make the event a reality. And, judging from the photographs, it looked like the participants enjoyed themselves and the town was very proud to host the event.

Take a look at the photographs to get a very brief glimpse of the evening’s festivities:

… Palazzo Romiti was the place to be

… Food prepared by the residents of Gagliato

… Visitors from around the World

… Prof. Mauro Ferrari, Mrs. Paola Ferrari and Jo Ann Fleischhauer worked with the residents to make it all happen. It is so obvious that the Ferraris are enamoured with Gagliato and that Gagliato has embraced them.

I would like to take this opportunity to again thank Prof. Mauro Ferrari, Mrs. Paola Ferrari and Jo Ann Fleischhauer for allowing Stephanie and I to be a part of NanoGagliato 2011. The process with us began in October of 2010 and culminated with photographs created and delivered to Jo Ann (in Houston) in July and she then personally transported them to Gagliato. It is obvious that great care went into the selection and preparation of the gallery space and the setup appeared to naturally blend in with the rustic surroundings. Our photographs looked amazing in the cantina. Thanks again. And, we would like to extend a big thank-you to the Romitis for graciously hosting the gallery.

Enjoy these 36 images (courtesy of Jo Ann Fleischhauer) that I have selected from the opening night… there are many to choose from and I will post more in the future. But, for now…

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More pictures from Gagliato… Part II – Preparation of the town for NanoGagliato

In anticipation of NanoGagliato 2011, Jo Ann Fleischhauer and Paola Ferrari along with several volunteers from Gagliato prepared the town with large canvas images depicting selections of nano-subjects. The canvas images were placed on the same buildings/structures that were featured in the photography exhibit which took place inside Palazzo Romiti (July 23rd – August 7th).

There are 39 images in the slideshow that follows (compliments/courtesy of Jo Ann Fleischhauer):

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Finally… some pictures from Gagliato… Part I – Photography Exhibit

I am so happy to share with you some images that have been sent to me by Jo Ann Fleischhauer.

This first set presents the exhibit set up in the cantina of Palazzo Romiti.

Unfortunately, as mentioned previously, Stephanie and I were unable to attend. But, these images show the obvious care, attention and creativity put into the framing, set up and presentation. Stephanie and I are very proud and truly thankful. We will reserve our full “thank you” until all of the selected sets have been presented on this blog.

There are 28 images in this slideshow.

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Another successful NanoGagliato…

I heard through the grapevine that the 2011 edition of NanoGagliato was a resounding success! Kudos to the organizers and to the people of Gagliato for their immense contributions and hard work… no wonder it was a success.

For my part, I carefully prepared 24 images that were exhibited in the cantina of Palazzo Romiti. I must admit, it was painful for me to work so hard at something and then not see it in its final form. Of course, I’m not blaming anyone for me missing it. The event simply conflicted with many other personal commitments and I could not make the long and time intensive voyage.

I would like to thank the organizers for allowing Stephanie’s and my work to be a part of this year’s event. And I would be remiss if I do not mention and thank Jo Ann Fleischhauer for her initiative, guidance and direction… and for taking so much care transporting our images to Gagliato and setting up the exhibit.

If you got a chance to see the exhibit or attended NanoGagliato, please write to info@gagliato.info to share your experiences.

I will have more to share soon.

Ciao for now,

N

NanoGagliato 2011 presents Poetic Scales: From Sand to Stones

I encourage all residents of Gagliato and visitors during this time to participate:

 

NanoGagliato 2011 presents Poetic Scales: From Sand to Stones, a multi layered art exhibition and visual dialogue between the residents of Gagliato, the scientists of NanoGagliato and Nicola and Stephanie Gareri from Toronto, Canada.

This exhibition weaves together photographs of Gagliato’s rich architectural past with large scale images of current explorations in nanoscience. An imaginative textual dialogue takes place between the residents of Gagliato and the visiting scientists using art as a bridge between people of different cultures and lifestyles.

Nico and Stephanie Gareri of Toronto, Canada, have captured Gagliato’s rich, poetic, architectural history in elegantly lush black+white photographic images. Presented suspended from the wooden ceiling beams in the frantoio of Palazzo Romiti, the Gareris’ photographs speak of visual memories and archeological poems steeped in history and family stories forgotten or never revealed.

Complementing the images produced by the Gareris, an exhibition of large-scale nano tapestries have been installed on the walls throughout the streets of Gagliato. “Tiny” nano structures captured with highly sophisticated imaging techniques have been enlarged and presented as nanobillboards or tapestries. Vibrantly colored using computer software, the once b/w microscopy images take on the appearance of exotic abstract landscapes. The “visual” conversation was created when the residents of Gagliato were asked to imaginatively respond to the exhibited nanoimages with short verbal phrases. After reading the residents’ remarks, the scientists offered their own creative responses, as well as a short explanation of what the scientific photograph actually was. Using a variety of fonts and lettering styles, the text was integrated into the images, to function as another visual layer.

The locations captured in the Gareris’ photographs pinpoint the locations of the nanotapestries. As the viewer walks through the streets searching for the nanoimages, the viewer begins to discover a layer of Gagliato’s personal story and poetry. The Grand Opening of the exhibition is set for Saturday July 23rd, at Palazzo Romiti (corner of via Roma and via Regina Margherita), around 8 pm. The ladies of Gagliato will offer traditional dishes, in the town’s welcome to the NanoGagliatesi 2011. The exhibit will run through August 7th.

The above information was taken from the NanoGagliato 2011 site at www.nanogagliato.org.

NanoGagliato 2011

Where will you be at 8:00 p.m. this coming Saturday?

If you happen to be in Gagliato, drop in at the opening reception for NanoGagliato 2011 at Palazzo Romiti – at the corner of Via Roma and Via Regina Margherita.

Unconfirmed events will include the following:

1. Photography exhibition in the cantina – photos by Nicola and Stephanie Gareri.

2. Photo installation throughout the lower part of town (‘u Pandinu) by Jo Ann Fleischhauer.

3. Introduction of the NanoGagliato speakers and program.

Food and refreshments will be provided by the residents of Gagliato.

More information can be found at the site dedicated to NanoGagliato 2011.

Upcoming Photo Exhibit In Gagliato

Well, hello everyone!

So sorry for the absence and inactivity, but I’ve been hard at work preparing a photo exhibit that will take place in Gagliato.

At the moment, the plans include an opening reception on July 23rd and the exhibit is slated to run until August 13th. The exhibition is a part of an art installation for NanoGagliato 2011 and will be curated by the person responsible, artist Jo Ann Fleischhauer, who hails from Houston, Texas.

More information will be made available over the coming days, and more details will be provided about NanoGagliato 2011.

So, just wanted to say hello!

Soon,

Nico

‘U Monacu – The Carthusian Grange (la grangia certosina)

Recently, someone inquired if I had any information about ‘u Monacu. As this involves the history of Gagliato, I decided to share my response with everyone.

‘U Monacu is the location just outside Gagliato where once stood an old monastery.

I was born in Gagliato but left at a young age. So, I did what anyone in my fortunate position would do – ask my parents and my brother – all born there and resident there for many years. They spoke of their recollections and the claims by many that spirits were (and apparently still are) a formidable aspect of the ruins.

On the cover of Domenico Vitale’s monogram, ‘i Zzippuli (see Arts and Culture section) published almost a half-century ago, is a bright rendition of what the ruins looked like at that time. Here is the image:

Well, if one tries to find those ruins today, I am told that very little remains. When my daughter and I photographed the town in 2007, the “famous” ruins were not in the visible horizon (maybe we didn’t look hard enough).

However, Francesco Pitaro (see Arts and Culture section), wrote an article that referenced the ruins and provided a very brief historical summary.

Last Sunday’s post entitled The Borgias and Gagliato, was conceived primarily because of  a connection that Francesco Pitaro described in his article. Today, this post has its roots in that same article.

In an effort to address the inquiry, I translated the piece and I have included both the original in Italian and my translation (any translation inaccuracies are solely my responsibility).

(Source: Francesco Pitaro in Gazzetta del Sud, 28 luglio 1996)

La grangia certosina

Dell’antica grangia certosina di Gagliato resta ben poco. Quell’antico insediamento monastico ha sempre rivestito per la comunità gagliatese, ma anche per quelle dei paesi limitrofi, una grande importanza. Con un piccolo sforzo di fantasia è possibile immaginare come tra quei monaci  e la gente del luogo fosse in atto un reciproco rapporto di laboriosità e di preghiera.  Tempi remoti, di cui oggi non giunge altro che un’eco lontana, quanto suggestiva e toccante. Ancor vivo è invece il disappunto per l’insipienza di quanti permisero che i ruderi del vecchio convento passassero in mani private, e quindi manomessi e irrimediabilmente deturpati.

La data di fondazione è alquanto problematica. Esiste tuttavia un documento che fa supporre che essa  dovette essere costruita a partire dal XII-XIII secolo. Si Tratta di un atto di donazione, datato 14 novembre 1191, per mezzo del quale si assegnava al monastero di Santo Stefano del Bosco un podere nel territorio di Gagliato (prœdium positum in agro Galliati). La grangia dovette essere molto fiorente dal punto di vista economico.  Essa infatti amministrava un vasto feudo che ricadeva nei comuni, oltre a quello di Gagliato, di Satriano, San Sostene, Davoli e Argusto.

Tra le sue mura, fra l’altro, si spense padre Saverio Cannizzari, priore della certosa di Serra San Bruno dal 1766 al 1774, nonché profondo studioso di matematica e astronomia.  Ciò avvenne il 10 gennaio 1784, quasi esattamente un anno dopo il catastrofico sisma che devastò l’intera Calabria. Cominciò da quell’infausto evento la decadenza del cenobio: la Cassa sacra e i francesi, in fasi diverse, dapprima lo sospendevano e poi lo sopprimevano assorbendone tutti i possedimenti.

Uno studio più approfondito su questo personaggio e sulla sua permanenza in questo eremo mi riservo di riprenderlo quando il tempo a dispostone me lo consentirà. In ciò avvalendomi di un paziente ed encomiabile lavoro di ricerca minuziosa che fece per me, molti anni or sono, il bibliotecario della certosa di Serra San Bruno, padre Serafino Caminada. I documenti da lui rinvenuti negli archivi, e vergati di suo pugno con minuta calligrafia, mi sono preziosi e mi hanno permesso di scoprire questo aspetto riconducibile alla grangia gagliatese.

The Carthusian Grange (translation)

Very little remains of the ancient Carthusian grange at the outskirts of Gagliato. That ancient monastic settlement was of benefit and of great importance to the people of Gagliato and those in neighbouring towns. With a little effort and imagination we can conceive that the monks and the locals had in place a solid relationship of hard work and prayer. A time so remote, which today is but a distant echo, yet evocative and touching. The memory still lives, but with disappointment at the foolishness of those who allowed the ruins of the old convent to pass into private hands, now compromised and irreparably scarred.

The exact founding date is somewhat problematic to determine. However, there is a document that suggests that it had to be built sometime in the twelfth or thirteenth century. The document is a “deed of gift” dated November 14, 1191, by which was assigned to the monastery of Santo Stefano del Bosco a farm in the territory of Gagliato (prœdium positum in agro Galliati). The grange must have been economically strong, as it also administered a large estate that bordered the towns of Gagliato, Satriano, San Sostene, Davoli and Argusto.

Within its walls, among other things, died Father Xavier Cannizzaro, Prior of the Charterhouse of Serra San Bruno from 1766 to 1774, who was a profound scholar of mathematics and astronomy. He died on January 10, 1784, almost exactly a year after the catastrophic earthquake that devastated the entire Calabria. From that inauspicious event began the decline of the monastery: the Sacred Treasury and the French, in different phases, first suspended and then rescinded the activity by absorbing all the possessions.

A more detailed study of this character (Father Xavier Cannizzaro), and his stay at this retreat (the grange), I intend to resume when time permits. For such, I have volumes of minute details patiently, meticulously and commendably researched for me, many years ago, by the librarian of the Charterhouse of Serra San Bruno, Father Serafino Caminada. The documents he found in the archives, and penned in his own tiny handwriting, are precious to me and have allowed me to share some aspects of the Gagliatese grange.

The Borgias and Gagliato

Did you know that the Borgia family once ruled over Gagliato?

According to an article written by Francesco Pitaro, during the feudal fifteenth century, a certain Goffredo Borgia (brother of Cesare and Lucrezia Borgia) took control of the entire area by force, away from the Morano family who controlled it for most of the 1400’s. The Morano family was then licensed under a modus vivendi arrangement with Goffredo Borgia to continue to use the land.

The reason I’m writing this post today is because The Borgias mini-series will be broadcast beginning tonight. Who knows, maybe Gagliato or Catanzaro will be mentioned in this depiction of one of the most powerful (corrupt) families in the history of man (one title that the Borgia family held was the Princes of Squillace – Squillace is an area, including the Gulf of Squillace, just outside Catanzaro)? According to the Toronto Star, the story of the Borgias influenced Mario Puzo in the writing of The Godfather.

Here is the section of Francesco Pitaro’s article in the original Italian:

Di questo paese  [Gagliato] si hanno notizie storiche a partire dal XV secolo, allorché era un feudo della famiglia dei Morano che lo ebbe in proprietà fino a tutto il ‘400. Passò poi ai Borgia, principi di Squillace, che lo avevano sottratto ai Morano con la forza. Protagonista di questo fatto d’arme era stato Goffredo Borgia, fratello di Cesare, il Valentino, e di Lucrezia, sorretto da un gabellotto del luogo, tale Gironda. In seguito il feudo tornò ai legittimi proprietari in forza di un modus vivendi, con l’usurpatore Goffredo.

Nel 1494 Ferdinando I re di Napoli espropriò tutti i beni del Morano e li assegnò a Luca Sanseverino, barone di San Marco. Nel 1626, per vincolo matrimoniale, passò ai Sanchez de Luna i quali acquisirono il titolo di marchese. Infine, nel 1714, a questi succedettero i Sanseverino. Un decennio dopo fu riacquistato dai Sanchez de Luna che incardinarono il titolo di duca. A distanza di alcuni anni era questa famiglia di origine spagnola che lo alienò in favore  dei Castiglione Morelli che lo trasformarono in baronia.

Nel 1806 ebbe inizio l’eversione della feudalità a opera di Giuseppe Bonaparte e l’antico feudo di Gagliato fu trasformato in luogo appartenente al «governo» di Satriano. Con il successivo decreto istitutivo dei comuni, 4 maggio 1811, venne dichiarato comune del comprensorio di Chiaravalle Centrale.

(Francesco Pitaro in Gazzetta del Sud, 28 luglio 1996; lo stesso articolo, con opportuni aggiustamenti, l’autore ha pubblicato sul mensile della Giunta regionale della Calabria i Calabresi nel mondo, aprile 2000)


Blast From The Past… #008

Here’s a younger version of Antonia (Gallello) Giorgio with a sprained ankle (another casualty of the “annual games”) at the 1977 Gagliato Social Club picnic… [Click on the image to zoom in/out. To return here afterwards, click on the browser “back” button]…

If you’d like to leave a message about this image – CLICK on the title of the post and you will be taken to the post’s page. At the bottom of that page, you will see a “Leave A Reply” section – simply sign in using your email address and type in your comments. It’s that simple!

Blast From The Past… #007

I’m going to be a little selfish today and post an image of my father’s parents (Francesco Gareri and Maria Grazia Pirroncello). This was taken by me at the Gagliato Social Club 1977 picnic. [Click on the image to zoom in/out. To return here afterwards, click on the browser “back” button]…

If you’d like to leave a message about this image – CLICK on the title of the post and you will be taken to the post’s page. At the bottom of that page, you will see a “Leave A Reply” section – simply sign in using your email address and type in your comments. It’s that simple!

Blast From The Past… #006

Here’s another unmanned tripod shot [Click on the image to zoom in/out. To return here afterwards, click on the browser “back” button]…

Gagliato Social Club Picnic 1977

Do you recognize anyone in this photo? If you do, CLICK on the title of the post and you will be taken to the post’s page. At the bottom of that page, you will see a “Leave A Reply” section – simply sign in using your email address and type in your comments. It’s that simple!

Hint: The guy on the left is me. The guy on the right lost his Afro completely!

Blast From The Past… #005

I still have a few more to share from that day back then… the 1977 Gagliato Social Club picnic. Here’s one more [Click on the image to zoom in/out. To return here afterwards, click on the browser “back” button]…

Gagliato Social Club Picnic 1977

Do you recognize anyone in this photo? If you do, CLICK on the title of the post and you will be taken to the post’s page. At the bottom of that page, you will see a “Leave A Reply” section – simply sign in using your email address and type in your comments. It’s that simple!

Blast From The Past… #004

Still sharing some pics from the 1977 Gagliato Social Club picnic, here’s one more [Click on the image to zoom in/out. To return here afterwards, click on the browser “back” button]…

1977 Gagliato Social Club picnic

Do you recognize anyone in this photo? If you do, CLICK on the title of the post and you will be taken to the post’s page. At the bottom of that page, you will see a “Leave A Reply” section – simply sign in using your email address and type in your comments. It’s that simple!

Blast From The Past… #003

Here’s yet another image from the 1977 Gagliato Social Club picnic [Click on the image to zoom in/out. To return here afterwards, click on the browser “back” button]…

Do you recognize anyone in this photo? If you do, CLICK on the title of the post and you will be taken to the post’s page. At the bottom of that page, you will see a “Leave A Reply” section – simply sign in using your email address and type in your comments. It’s that simple!

Blast From The Past… #002

Here’s a second photo from the 1977 Gagliato Social Club picnic [Click on the image to zoom in/out. To return here afterwards, click on the browser “back” button]…

Do you recognize anyone in this photo? If you do, CLICK on the title of the post and you will be taken to the post’s page. At the bottom of that page, you will see a “Leave A Reply” section – simply sign in using your email address and type in your comments. It’s that simple!

Blast From The Past… #001

Here’s one of my early photos taken at the 1977 Gagliato Social Club picnic [Click on the image to zoom in/out. To return here afterwards, click on the browser “back” button]…

Gagliato Social Club Picnic 1978 Photo #24

Do you recognize anyone in this photo? If you do, CLICK on the title of the post and you will be taken to the post’s page. At the bottom of that page, you will see a “Leave A Reply” section – simply sign in using your email address and type in your comments. It’s that simple!

In The Quiet Of The Mind There Is Gagliato

In the past, I have written that many people who were born in Gagliato and have emigrated away likely do not discuss “Gagliato” openly, but they do hold it, the town and/or the concept, very dear to their heart — in silence. It’s almost like suffering in silence. I believe those individuals have a lot to contribute to our understanding of Gagliato and Gagliatesi, and I would be fascinated by their contributions.

For culture to remain strong, it must be passed on. I urge you to consider sharing your experiences with the members of this forum — and the world.

Presentation of “Gagliato” Photography Book To Gagliato

On January 10, 2009 Gagliato was presented with “Gagliato”, the photography book recently released by Nicola & Stephanie Gareri. The ceremony included an introduction by Gagliato’s Mayor, Giovanni Sgro’, the reading of the authors’ letter by lawyer Francesco Gareri from Argusto (the authors’ representative), and closing remarks by lawyer and former Mayor, Luigi Romiti. Many were in attendance as books were distributed to individuals who hosted or assisted the photographers while in Gagliato as well as to individuals who were photographed and presented in the book. Photographs of the presentation are available online at the La Strumba blog as well as at the Ergon Cultural Society site (see the “links” section). The various written sections of the book will be translated into Italian and presented in summary form on the La Strumba blog over the coming weeks.

“Gagliato” Photo Exhibit And Book Launch

Nico (Nicola) and Stephanie Gareri’s first photographic (coffee table) book, simply titled “Gagliato”, was launched on September 18th, 2008 at the Joseph D. Carrier Art Gallery in Toronto. The 300+ guests in attendance were treated to a special presentation of the “Gagliato” photographic exhibit which included 46 framed limited edition prints, musical interludes by Jon Gareri (piano) and Sahra Featherstone (harp), and a delicious variety of cheeses, breads, grapes, berries, figs and wines. The exhibit was well received by the many visitors during its scheduled run (September 1st – 28th) and its extended stay until October 2nd. The book “Gagliato” is available on-line and at selected locations. Please visit http://www.studio-on-the-avenue.com for details.